Micro Nutrients


Protein
Protein is the main structural component of the body. Organs, muscles, blood, cell membranes, and immune system are all made up of protein. Proteins consist of units called amino acids, and are found throughout our diet in meats, dairy products, eggs, poultry, fish, legumes, and soy. Strung together in complex formations. Since, proteins are complex molecules, the body takes longer to break them down. As a result, they are a much slower and longer-lasting source of energy than carbohydrates. There are 20 amino acids.

Fats
Fats are complex molecules composed of fatty acids and glycerol. The body needs fats for growth and energy. It also uses them to synthesize hormones and other substances needed for the body’s activities Fats are the slowest source of energy but the most energy-efficient form of food. Each gram of fat supplies the body with about 9 calories, more than twice that supplied by proteins or carbohydrates.

Simple Carbohydrates
Various forms of sugar, such as glucose and sucrose (table sugar), are simple carbohydrates. They are small molecules, so they can be broken down and absorbed by the body quickly and are the quickest source of energy. They quickly increase the level of blood glucose (blood sugar). Fruits, dairy products, honey, and maple syrup contain large amounts of simple carbohydrates.

Complex Carbohydrates
These carbohydrates are composed of long strings of simple carbohydrates. Because complex carbohydrates are larger molecules than simple carbohydrates, they must be broken down into simple carbohydrates before they can be absorbed. Thus, they tend to provide energy to the body more slowly.

Macro Nutrients


Amino Acids
There are 20 different amino acids. Amino acids are linked together to form small chains of amino acids. These chains link together to form proteins.

Antioxidants
May protect the cells in your body from oxidative damage. As the body uses oxygen, there are by-products known as “free radicals ” that can cause damage to cells. Antioxidants are known to repair these free radicals and are associated with a decreased risk of many chronic diseases. Some examples of antioxidants include beta-carotene, vitamins A, C, and E, lutein, lycopene and quercetin.

Vitamins
A substance, required in a small amount, that is essential for normal growth and activity of the body. Vitamins are obtained through the foods you eat. They are classified as fat-soluble or water-soluble vitamins.

Essential Fatty Acids (EFA)
When the body needs fatty acids, it can make (synthesize) certain ones. Others, called essential fatty acids, cannot be synthesized and must be consumed in the diet. The essential fatty acids make up about 7% of the fat consumed in a normal diet and about 3% of total calories (about 8 grams). They include linoleic acid and linolenic acid, which are present in certain vegetable oils.

Enzyme
A specialized substance that acts as a catalyst to regulate the speed of the many chemical reactions involved in the metabolism of living organisms. In nutrition, enzymes are substances that break down carbohydrates, proteins and fats for digestion and absorption. Digestive enzymes include lipase that breaks down fats, amylase that breaks down sugars and carbohydrates, and protease that breaks down proteins.

Complex Carbohydrates
These carbohydrates are composed of long strings of simple carbohydrates. Because complex carbohydrates are larger molecules than simple carbohydrates, they must be broken down into simple carbohydrates before they can be absorbed. Thus, they tend to provide energy to the body more slowly.

Dietary Supplements
A dietary supplement is a product that contains substances like vitamins, minerals, foods, botanicals, amino acids and is intended to supplement the usual intake of these substances. Dietary supplements are found in pill, tablet, capsule, powder or liquid form and are meant to be taken by mouth. Also Known As: Nutritional Supplements or Vitamins

Educational Videos


[youtubegallery]




[/youtubegallery]


THE SUPPLEMENT EXPERTS